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Iceland

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Grace Leigh Art

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FRIÐHEIMAR restaurant

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#graceleightravelart

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 Talan David Photography and Nomatic travel essentials

Talan David Photography and Nomatic travel essentials

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#graceleighphotography

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glæsibragur

My sister made her way to Iceland about 4 years before me. What is incredible are the differences in our experiences. When Tessa Rose Art went, she rented a camper van and drove around the island. But the thing is, tourism had yet to show the effects on the land. Tessa and my cousin, Teri drove for miles on deserted roads and every waterfall they came across, (even the most famous or popular waterfalls) were able to drive directly up to the waterfalls on the unpaved land and camp for the night. Four years later, when I made my way to Iceland, we too rented camper vans but instead of natural terrain surrounding some of the most magnificent waterfalls, there were paved parking lots and iron steps. Camper vans weren’t invited to spend the night but had to find actual camping sites, sometimes miles away. While it was still a wonderful place to be and its beauty was still obvious, tourism made its mark in a few short years. I wonder, is there a way for everyone to see the world in its natural state without seeing the effects of tourism?